Borderland Engineering, Inc.

Civil Engineer - Land Survey

Below are answers to commonly asked questions property owners may have regarding FEMA Elevation Certificates and Flood Insurance. 


An Elevation Certificate compiles actual ground survey measurements to determine the elevation of your structure and surrounding grades in relation to a vertical datum. 


Flood maps give a generalized determination of flood zones based on data from various sources and are not intended to focus on a certain structure or property. 


An Elevation Certificate issued by a licensed professional can determine if your structure is above an issued base flood elevation and the requirement for flood insurance.

ELEVATION CERTIFICATES

What is a flood certification?
A flood certification or FEMA Elevation Certificate is a form prepared by a registered professional, required by lenders or insurers to help accurately determine the risk of flooding. 

What is an elevation certificate used for?
A FEMA Elevation Certificate is used by lenders or insurers to help accurately determine the risk of flooding.  Depending on the flood zone designation and the elevation of the structure and surrounding ground, it could prove that flood insurance is not required.

Which flood zones require flood insurance?
Flood insurance is typically required in Special Hazard Flood Areas (SHFA) shown on FEMA Flood Maps.  These flood areas are most commonly designated as Zone A, AE or V.

Do I need an elevation certificate for flood insurance?
No, but having an Elevation Certificate prepared by a professional will help the insurance provider accurately determine the risk associated with flooding and in certain cases can even eliminate the requirement for flood insurance.

How do I get a flood elevation certificate?
Give us a call... according to FEMA "Certain activities (e.g., floodproofing design, V-Zone construction design, survey of building elevations, hydrologic and hydraulic analyses, survey and topographic data) require certification by a licensed professional architect, engineer, surveyor, or the community floodplain administrator."